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Facing Chemotherapy?

Tell Your Dentist Anyone facing cancer therapy already knows—chemotherapy for the treatment of cancer is a serious response to a serious condition. What they may not know is that a dental appointment scheduled at least two weeks before treatment begins can reduce the risk of complications and help preserve salivary glands. The reason is this: with radiation treatment and chemotherapy, changes in saliva occur that can encourage decay and dry mouth, diminish taste, and thicken soft tissues—to name a few. All these side effects may be overcome if gums are healthy, restorations are intact, and oral hygiene habits are impeccable. So, if someone you know is scheduled for cancer therapy, share this information with them. A pre-treatment dental appointment made [...]

By |2020-03-28T17:19:38+00:00May 26th, 2020|Patient Education|Comments Off on Facing Chemotherapy?

Alcohol and Your Teeth

Dentally speaking, is drinking alcohol a good thing or a bad thing for your teeth and gums? As with everything alcohol-related, there are positives and negatives. On one hand, a mixer-free shot of vodka is probably less hazardous than caramel candies, which coat the teeth with a sticky goo that practically begs for cavities. On the other hand, every kind of alcohol—most notoriously drinks with sugary mixes—is chock-full of their own types of sugar. Sugar is the main source of energy for plaque bacteria, and these bacteria are the villains that cause tooth decay. As plaque bacteria process sugar, they produce a variety of acids as metabolic by-products; some of these acids go to work immediately to dissolve the teeth. [...]

By |2020-03-28T17:17:02+00:00May 19th, 2020|Patient Education|Comments Off on Alcohol and Your Teeth

Mouthwash FAQs

Whether it's to mask bad breath, fight cavities or prevent the buildup of plaque, the sticky material that contains germs and can lead to oral diseases, mouthwash serves a variety of purposes. Or so we think. Though they may leave your mouth with a clean, fresh taste, some washes can be harmful, concealing bad breath and an unpleasant taste that are signs of periodontal diseases which cause inflammation and degeneration of the supporting structures of the teeth and tooth decay. Your dentist will tell you, most mouth rinses just don't wash. What are the differences? Mouthwash is generally classified by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as either cosmetic or therapeutic, or a combination of the two. Cosmetic rinses [...]

By |2020-03-28T17:14:50+00:00May 12th, 2020|Preventative Dentistry|Comments Off on Mouthwash FAQs

Facts on Flossing

Flosses and picks Plaque is a sticky layer of material containing germs that accumulate on teeth, including places where toothbrushes can't reach. This can lead to gum disease. The best way to get rid of plaque is to brush and floss your teeth carefully every day. The toothbrush cleans the tops and sides of your teeth. Dental floss cleans in between them. Some people use Waterpiks, but floss is the best choice. Should I floss? Yes. Floss removes plaque and debris that adhere to teeth and gums in between teeth, polishes tooth surfaces, and controls bad breath. Floss is the single most important weapon against plaque, perhaps more important than the toothbrush. Many people just don't spend enough time flossing [...]

By |2020-03-28T17:12:42+00:00May 5th, 2020|Preventative Dentistry|Comments Off on Facts on Flossing

Dental X-Ray FAQs

Why do I need X-Rays? X-rays, or radiographic examinations, provide us with an important tool that shows the condition of your teeth, its roots, jaw placement, and the overall composition of your facial bones. X-Rays can help determine the presence or degree of periodontal disease, abscesses, and many abnormal growths, such as cysts and tumors. X-Rays also can show the exact location of impacted and unerupted teeth. They can pinpoint the location of cavities and other signs of disease that may not be possible to detect through a visual examination. Do all patients have X-Rays taken every six months? No. Your X-Ray schedule is based on our assessment of your individual needs, including whether you're a new patient or a [...]

By |2019-12-31T19:37:16+00:00April 28th, 2020|Preventative Dentistry|Comments Off on Dental X-Ray FAQs

Bruxism – Grinding and Clenching

What is Bruxism? Bruxism is the technical term for grinding and clenching that wears down teeth and may cause facial pain. People who grind and clench, called bruxers, unintentionally bite down too hard at inappropriate times, such as in their sleep. In addition to grinding teeth, they also may bite their fingernails, pencils and chew the inside of their cheek. People usually aren't diagnosed with bruxism until it is too late because so many people don't realize they have the habit. Others mistakenly believe that their teeth must touch at all times. About one in three people suffer from bruxism, which can easily be treated by a dentist. Can bruxism cause harm? People who have otherwise healthy teeth and gums [...]

By |2019-12-31T19:33:36+00:00April 21st, 2020|Preventative Dentistry|Comments Off on Bruxism – Grinding and Clenching

Sunshine For Healthy Teeth and Bones

We don't hear a lot about vitamin D. It's crucial for healthy teeth and bones because it helps you absorb calcium. And the easiest way to get your minimum daily requirement is—take a walk in the sun! Vitamin D is called the "sunshine vitamin" because natural sunlight converts a chemical in your skin into a usable form of vitamin D. Experts at the Mayo Clinic write that, for most people, as little as 10 to 15 minutes of natural sunshine three times a week may provide that minimum requirement. Taking vitamins has never been easier, or more fun. Of course, some people may need a vitamin D boost that goes beyond a sunny stroll. Among them, older adults and especially [...]

By |2019-12-31T19:31:50+00:00April 14th, 2020|Patient Education|Comments Off on Sunshine For Healthy Teeth and Bones

Medicine & Your Mouth

The medicine you take for one physical disorder may literally rot your teeth. This is one of many reasons we need to know your medical history and current treatment. For instance... Chewable vitamin C supplements are a good idea for a lot of people, but check your brand for sugar content. For children especially, a liquid form does less damage to tooth enamel, and natural sources of the vitamin—oranges, green vegetables—are even better. Calcium channel blockers (Procardia, Cardizem, Adalat) cause swelling of the gums in at least 20% of patients with high blood pressure or heart disease. This can be very dangerous, as bacteria invade gums and may reach the heart itself. Over-the-counter preparations of all sorts—lozenges, cough drops, antacids—are [...]

By |2019-12-31T19:29:36+00:00April 7th, 2020|Patient Education|Comments Off on Medicine & Your Mouth

Osteoporosis: The Calcium Connection

Osteoporosis—porous bones—is a fragile, frightening reality for at least 15 million North Americans. What begins as a slow and initially painless decrease in bone mass eventually leaves bones weakened and susceptible to fracture. It turns strong backs into weak; healthy strides into shuffles. From a dental viewpoint, the disease is evident in loss of tooth strength and jaw erosion. Osteoporosis, most common in middle-aged women and the elderly, is particularly insidious in that it is rarely diagnosed until the damage is done. Evidence suggests that adequate calcium intake early on in our lives may reduce the risk of osteoporosis as we age. Lucky that children often show a natural fancy for calcium-rich dairy products—it's a happy addiction, as youngsters need [...]

By |2019-12-31T19:27:17+00:00March 24th, 2020|Nutrition|Comments Off on Osteoporosis: The Calcium Connection

Treating Halitosis

Whether you call it dragon breath, morning breath, or halitosis, persistent bad breath is not only socially embarrassing, it can also be a sign of poor oral hygiene, periodontal disease, digestive problems, and even sinus trouble. And all the mouthwashes and breath fresheners in the world won't solve the problem. A simple visit to our office is the real answer to finding the source and extent of the offensive odor and treating the cause. We now offer a wide range of diagnostic and preventive services to meet everyone's needs. A Personal Approach– Our team of specially trained staff will treat your individual needs with understanding and concern in a comfortable, caring environment. Initial Analysis– This is the first step of [...]

By |2019-12-31T19:20:24+00:00March 17th, 2020|Restorative Dentistry|Comments Off on Treating Halitosis