Restorative Dentistry

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Making Bad Breath Go Away

Where Bad Breath Comes From Most, but not all, bad breath comes from bacterial plaque and food accumulated mainly towards the back of the tongue. The problem is, there are all sorts of not-likely-but-possible other reasons for halitosis: upset stomach, anxiety, inflamed gums, saliva deficiency, infections and removable dentures are among them. What Not To Do Because nobody—but nobody!—wants bad breath, a billion-dollar industry has sprung up hawking a variety of mouthwashes, rinses, drops, pastes and mints to mask halitosis. But there's a huge difference between hiding the symptoms and treating the cause of Dragon Breath. Take mouthwash. It tastes and feels like it's solving the problem. But most mouthwashes are alcohol-based. Alcohol dries out the mouth, which can re-ignite [...]

By |2022-01-27T19:33:32+00:00July 26th, 2022|Restorative Dentistry|Comments Off on Making Bad Breath Go Away

Dental Implants: The Next Best Thing to Natural Teeth

Once teeth are missing from the jawbone—whether one or many; whether from accident or disease—something very important is missing as well. That's tooth stability. Any denture wearer will tell you there's nothing more upsetting than a slipping lower denture and the anxious uncertainty it brings. That's because once one or more teeth are removed, the jawbone that previously anchored the roots begins to dissolve. Dental researchers worked for years to find ways to keep bone from shrinking. Now we're proud to offer a solution that prevents bone loss while permitting durable, fixed, permanent restorations. They're dental implants. And they're the next best tooth replacement option to the real thing, because they're rooted in bone just like your original teeth. The [...]

By |2022-01-27T19:31:38+00:00July 19th, 2022|Restorative Dentistry|Comments Off on Dental Implants: The Next Best Thing to Natural Teeth

Gone Missing

Lose a tooth? We can help you choose the right replacement option. CROWN & BRIDGE is a collective phrase for several methods of restoring teeth. When a tooth has been damaged but is healthy enough to save, we place a crown that covers it and binds it together for strength. Crowns can be fashioned from gold or alloys, porcelain, or a combination of materials. A bridge can span a single missing tooth, or many. Conventional bridges usually involve crowns at both ends with a false tooth, called a "pontic." DENTURES—full or partial—are artificial teeth, usually removable, that fit over the gums where natural teeth are missing. We place conventional dentures after all tissues have healed. Immediate dentures go in immediately [...]

By |2022-01-10T22:54:38+00:00May 24th, 2022|Restorative Dentistry|Comments Off on Gone Missing

Ouch! Why am I Wincing?

A sudden, sharp pain when you bite—that's seemingly out of nowhere? Most likely, it's a cracked tooth. Even a hairline fracture in a cavity-free molar can make the most hardy of us sit up and take notice. When you're visited by this kind of bite-down pain, get to the dentist quick. Most cracks are superficial, affecting only part of the crown, but others are more significant and traverse the tooth deeply enough to expose root structure. The simpler "and more common" fractures that affect only enamel are easily treated with an onlay or crown. The deeper ones threaten the vitality of the tooth and require a rapid and more complicated response. And your pain can't tell the difference. Neither youth [...]

By |2022-01-04T20:45:04+00:00March 15th, 2022|Restorative Dentistry|Comments Off on Ouch! Why am I Wincing?

Dentistry and the Older Adult

With people living longer, we, as dentists, recognize that the dental profession must shoulder a new responsibility for enduring dental care. We all hope we'll live to a ripe old age. At the same time, we want to enjoy the rest of our years and live a quality life. As people age, they become more prone to certain chronic conditions. Old adults may encounter root decay, erosion of the root surfaces, fracturing of fillings and brittle teeth, or gum infection. People with dentures or partials may find that their bony ridges will continue to recede. What can be done? Root decay and gum disease—Continue to use fluoride toothpaste with tartar and plaque control. There are some newer toothpastes and rinses [...]

By |2022-01-04T20:39:07+00:00February 8th, 2022|Restorative Dentistry|Comments Off on Dentistry and the Older Adult

What Causes a Toothache, Besides Cavities

"My tooth hurts. It must have a cavity." Well, maybe it does. However, other conditions can cause a tooth to be sensitive to hot or cold foods, to the pressure of chewing... or to just plain ache. A few of these other toothache possibilities are: Shrinkage of the gum down below the top part of the tooth (crown) onto the tooth surface. This part of the tooth (cementum) is as sensitive to hot and cold as the part of the tooth (dentin) affected by a cavity. A new filling. When a tooth is treated to repair a cavity, it will sometimes be sensitive for a while afterward. This reaction is normal and will usually soon correct itself. A tooth that [...]

By |2021-06-25T20:49:57+00:00August 17th, 2021|Restorative Dentistry|Comments Off on What Causes a Toothache, Besides Cavities

The Deal with Dentures

Dentures are one of those subjects where so much information is passed around and so little is really understood. Popular wisdom has it that only the first set of dentures fit properly. That's only partially true. They tend to feel best because the gum ridges have not yet receded. But we can now re-fit new dentures that look and feel just as good as the original. Denture fit depends largely on the health of the gums. That's why we recommend you see us at least once a year for a denture check-up. Denture adhesives? At best, a band-aid solution. Our office can do better than that. And no, overuse of your denture doesn't cause it to wobble. That's a result [...]

By |2021-06-25T20:45:43+00:00July 27th, 2021|Restorative Dentistry|Comments Off on The Deal with Dentures

Caring for a Dental Bridge

If you have had one or more missing teeth replaced with a dental bridge restoration (also sometimes called a fixed partial denture), then be sure to keep up the good work by properly caring for it. Just following these helpful tips will have you well on your way to a strong and healthy bridge for years to come. Some reminders on maintaining your dental bridge: Maintain healthy neighboring teeth by brushing and flossing regularly. Plaque can accumulate under, around, and between your bridge and natural teeth. Any disease near your bridge threatens the whole works. Bridges simply take a little more effort to keep clean than natural teeth. And you need to practice in order to master these skills. We'll [...]

By |2021-06-25T20:42:10+00:00July 13th, 2021|Restorative Dentistry|Comments Off on Caring for a Dental Bridge

Wisdom Teeth Removal

And what exactly does 'impacted' mean? Any tooth has the potential to become impacted—that is, emerges in some oddball direction that crowds other teeth. But the most famous culprits are third molars, the last-to-emerge wisdom teeth. Not many mouths can accommodate these teeth. They often wind up pressing against their neighbors, ultimately pressuring the rest of the teeth to disrupt their alignment. That's not a wise thing to let happen. Wisdom teeth get our attention when they cause pain and swelling. Routine X-rays, beginning around age 12, alert us to problem potential before wisdom teeth start getting disruptive. X-rays can let us know whether those mighty molars must go.

By |2021-02-20T17:33:02+00:00June 1st, 2021|Restorative Dentistry|Comments Off on Wisdom Teeth Removal

Is Your Mouth Older Than…

A mouth at age 50 enters a whole new world marked by a set of problems you never dreamed of when your mouth was filled with bubble gum and the latest slang. Celebrate Great Taste! Expect taste buds to fade gradually with age. But the senses of taste and smell can disappear quickly in diabetics—or overnight as a result of stroke, Parkinson's, or Huntington's Disease. Have the loss checked out—and make food more palatable with herbs and spices. Don't Swallow Bitterness! Menopause often leads to hormonal imbalance or to vitamin or mineral deficiency, resulting in a bitter taste or burning in the mouth. Detection of the deficiency can lead to correction of the problem. Tender is the Face TMJ (temporomandibular [...]

By |2021-02-20T17:22:45+00:00April 27th, 2021|Restorative Dentistry|Comments Off on Is Your Mouth Older Than…