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Tool of the Trade

Sure, everybody knows dental floss when they see it (we hope), and if you're in a periodontal program, you may be using miles of it. But do you recognize this gizmo? It's for "interdental" hygiene, especially useful for people with substantial spaces between their teeth at the gum line. Some studies show that interdental brushing, in combination with regular brushing and flossing, does a real number on plaque. Go gently, though. Any extreme pressure between the teeth, particularly in the presence of gum problems, can disturb the tissue.

By |2022-01-27T19:25:05+00:00June 14th, 2022|Preventative Dentistry|Comments Off on Tool of the Trade

Prevention is Your Best Protection

If you're like the rest of us, now that belt-tightening is the "new normal," you may already be eating more meals at home, dropping subscriptions, vacationing closer to home. You may also be tempted to cut back on your dental care. But think it over. If a problem has surfaced with your oral health, nipping it in the bud is a big money saver. Letting it go can mean big, costly—and sometimes painful—treatment down the line. You're smarter than that. During your appointment, we'll check for tooth decay, of course, but also for periodontal disease, not only to protect your teeth and gums but to keep you alive and healthy. Yes, there's a direct link between gum disease and your [...]

By |2022-01-04T20:44:07+00:00March 8th, 2022|Preventative Dentistry|Comments Off on Prevention is Your Best Protection

OUCH! Pizza Burns

Do you enjoy eating fresh, hot pizza? If so, you may have experienced a common mouth injury—"pizza burn." Dentists use this term for a minor burn of the gums and the roof of the mouth (palate). The most frequent cause is biting into hot food such as pizza. The telltale sign of a pizza burn is a blister or ulcer on the small, raised area of gum behind the front teeth (incisive papilla) or near the upper first molar. This injury is not usually serious, but it will be mildly uncomfortable, especially during eating, for several days. Avoid biting into coarse or hot foods, and brush and floss carefully. If the area is very painful, a topical anesthetic should make [...]

By |2021-10-20T19:24:15+00:00November 23rd, 2021|Patient Education|Comments Off on OUCH! Pizza Burns

Regular Check-Ups

Come on in for a check-up, we’re happy to see you again! We enjoy catching up with the news in your life—and we pride ourselves on providing you that "stitch in time" that can prevent trouble. If a problem is developing in your mouth, we like to catch it while it's small. It's not just tooth decay, although that's where we look first. Then we'll check for early signs of gum disease, now linked to some serious—even fatal—diseases. Most of you have been diligent about brushing and flossing, and many of you no longer smoke or never started. That's great! Your mouth will thank you. While you're here, let's talk about what more you can do. Is your drinking water [...]

By |2021-06-25T20:48:45+00:00August 10th, 2021|Preventative Dentistry|Comments Off on Regular Check-Ups

Caring for a Dental Bridge

If you have had one or more missing teeth replaced with a dental bridge restoration (also sometimes called a fixed partial denture), then be sure to keep up the good work by properly caring for it. Just following these helpful tips will have you well on your way to a strong and healthy bridge for years to come. Some reminders on maintaining your dental bridge: Maintain healthy neighboring teeth by brushing and flossing regularly. Plaque can accumulate under, around, and between your bridge and natural teeth. Any disease near your bridge threatens the whole works. Bridges simply take a little more effort to keep clean than natural teeth. And you need to practice in order to master these skills. We'll [...]

By |2021-06-25T20:42:10+00:00July 13th, 2021|Restorative Dentistry|Comments Off on Caring for a Dental Bridge

Too Much of a Good Thing

You can overdo anything. Even brushing your teeth. Take a stiff-bristled brush. Scrub back and forth compulsively for five minutes, as though you were trying to get tar off the sidewalk. It's possible you'll end up with "toothbrush abrasion." According to the ADA (American Dental Association), the condition is associated with factors beyond brushing: a mouth used to lots of acidic foods, citrus fruit drinks, carbonated beverages. We recommend gentle brushing, plus a toothbrush with soft, polished bristles.

By |2021-02-20T17:36:09+00:00June 15th, 2021|Preventative Dentistry|Comments Off on Too Much of a Good Thing

Tooth Watch: Early Detection

Why Early Detection is so Important Wouldn't you say that the best dental treatment is the one you never had to undergo in the first place—because it was caught and corrected in time? We sure would! We're always on the lookout for a potential problem that can be avoided. That's why during any checkup, we specialize in early detection to let you know about any problem areas we might see and are of course happy to demonstrate proper brushing/flossing techniques anytime. Often, you can avoid future chair time with just a little TLC. There's another good reason for regular dental appointments. Your mouth is a sort of distant early warning system of all sorts of things going on: in your [...]

By |2020-12-29T16:57:48+00:00January 19th, 2021|Preventative Dentistry|Comments Off on Tooth Watch: Early Detection

Sense about Sensitivity

When teeth hurt, the sooner we reach the root of the problem, the sooner the pain disappears. What triggers tooth pain? Heat, cold, touch, air, sweet or sour foods. If you recently had a cavity filled, that area may be sensitive for a while. Other causes of sensitivity are: Erosion of tooth enamel. Gum shrinkage down below the crown exposing the cementum beneath, an area sensitive to heat and cold. One or more teeth shifting into a position where they strike too hard against other teeth. This can happen to anyone, but it's most frequent when a lost tooth is not replaced. Clenching or grinding of teeth, whether awake or asleep. Try This At Home Desensitizing toothpaste (look for the [...]

By |2020-07-27T19:07:32+00:00November 24th, 2020|Restorative Dentistry|Comments Off on Sense about Sensitivity

Can Kissing Cause Cavities?

Sorry to say, it can. In fact, anything involving contact with saliva—a kiss, parents tasting their babies' food, sharing of tableware, and toothbrushes—can transmit decay-causing bacteria. Soon after birth, infants start to get those bacteria that inhabit the mouth and cause cavities. These germs are usually transferred by the babies' mothers or other family members. When one so innocent can be SO susceptible, we need to provide our mouths with the best defense against the enemy. Brushing and flossing are a good beginning, as they interrupt the growth of bacterial plaque. Getting teeth straightened can help, because straight teeth are better able to resist cavities. Less frequent snacking and diets low in sugary foods reduce the amount of bacteria acids [...]

By |2020-06-27T20:32:42+00:00September 1st, 2020|Preventative Dentistry|Comments Off on Can Kissing Cause Cavities?

Manual or Mechanical?

Back and forth goes the argument—what toothbrush is best? Gadgeteers can spend $150 for an electric brush designed to rotate and oscillate, with angled neck, sure-grip handle, dual speed control, and even a timer. Researchers say that rotation-oscillation electric brushes remove plaque and reduce gingivitis better than any other kind—but only slightly better. Do-it-yourselfers can pick up a manual toothbrush for under $3 at the pharmacy. Replace it every three months for two years—the warranty period on the electric brush—and you can save big bucks. Kids often prefer electric brushes because the smaller brush head makes it easier to reach those hard-to-reach back teeth. They also like the buzz or one of the singing toothbrushes. Electric brushes are often the [...]

By |2020-06-27T20:32:32+00:00August 25th, 2020|Patient Education|Comments Off on Manual or Mechanical?