cavities

Home » cavities

Alcohol and Your Health…

Just the Facts There's so much conflicting information regarding drinking alcohol blasting at us these days. A glass of red wine is good? Is even drinking at all a good idea? It's a matter of proportion. The facts are these. First, alcohol affects women more than men. Because men tend to be heavier in muscle mass, their bodies can process slightly more alcohol with fewer negative consequences than women's. But there's something else: the amount of an enzyme known as gastric alcohol dehydrogenase that's produced. Women naturally produce less of this than men and, thus, are less likely to break down alcohol. Because of this difference, it's important that women take extra caution with alcohol consumption. It's a fact that [...]

By |2022-07-12T16:34:33+00:00August 2nd, 2022|Patient Education|Comments Off on Alcohol and Your Health…

Fluoride, it’s for Life

If your goal is healthy teeth for life, then you need fluoride. It ensures newly formed teeth are strong; prevents plaque, cavities, and gum disease; and protects roots that get exposed as gums recede over time. This essential mineral is present in what we eat and drink, but a healthy diet doesn't supply enough for a gleaming smile. Instead, it's important to apply it topically and drink fluoride-rich water. In toothpaste, it boosts the cavity resistance of existing teeth. Systemic fluoride, in water, creates healthy tooth structure and supplies fluoride for the saliva. Are You Sure There's Fluoride In Your Water? Bottled water intake is skyrocketing. That'd be great news health-wise, except most bottled water falls far short of the [...]

By |2021-10-20T19:30:03+00:00December 21st, 2021|Preventative Dentistry|Comments Off on Fluoride, it’s for Life

Can You Catch a Cavity?

When you have a cold, we all know to cover your mouth before you sneeze and not to drink out of the same glass. We do this because we know that a cold is contagious. Now we know that chances are, so is tooth decay. Recent research suggests that the germs responsible for cavities may be "catchy." Likewise, scientists suspect that bacteria associated with gum disease may be transferable from husband to wife, or mother to child. Infants get the bacteria that come to inhabit the mouth and digestive tract soon after birth. These germs are usually transferred in the course of handling by the babies' mothers or other family members, and anything involving contact with saliva—parents kissing their babies [...]

By |2021-06-25T20:53:46+00:00September 7th, 2021|Preventative Dentistry|Comments Off on Can You Catch a Cavity?

What Causes a Toothache, Besides Cavities

"My tooth hurts. It must have a cavity." Well, maybe it does. However, other conditions can cause a tooth to be sensitive to hot or cold foods, to the pressure of chewing... or to just plain ache. A few of these other toothache possibilities are: Shrinkage of the gum down below the top part of the tooth (crown) onto the tooth surface. This part of the tooth (cementum) is as sensitive to hot and cold as the part of the tooth (dentin) affected by a cavity. A new filling. When a tooth is treated to repair a cavity, it will sometimes be sensitive for a while afterward. This reaction is normal and will usually soon correct itself. A tooth that [...]

By |2021-06-25T20:49:57+00:00August 17th, 2021|Restorative Dentistry|Comments Off on What Causes a Toothache, Besides Cavities

Pssst – Secret Sugars

Lurks in Every Pantry Your sugar bowl sits on the table, and you lift its lid only to sweeten your morning coffee. You deserve a medal for exemplary nutritional behavior! Are you sure? Most folks eat more of it than they realize—150 pounds per year on average. That's 6 ounces—3/4 of a cup—every day. Two-thirds of Americans are overweight, many of them children. Doctors predict that an epidemic of diabetes will follow the obesity epidemic. Lose that sugar bowl and you still consume it in cakes, pies, and cookies. Ditch the desserts and your intake remains high. What's going on? Here's what—sugar is added to canned fruits, vegetables, soups, breakfast cereals, gravies, sauces, meats, salad dressings, rice and pasta mixes, [...]

By |2021-02-20T17:28:17+00:00May 18th, 2021|Nutrition|Comments Off on Pssst – Secret Sugars

Listen to Your Teeth

An aching tooth's a warning. Often it's a cavity, but not always. Other Toothache Causes... After a filling, a tooth can sometimes be a bit sensitive. It's a normal reaction that should soon correct it-self. In the morning, an aching tooth could be the result of grinding or tooth-clenching overnight. Not a cavity, but a habit you need to shake. Aches can also come from unfamiliar pressures due to tooth movement, especially when a tooth has shifted because a lost tooth wasn't replaced. Sinus problems can make an upper molar ache. An infected sinus presses against the nerve and can cause pain. Any change in tooth-feel is a warning worth investigating, so don't hesitate to contact us if pain persists.

By |2021-02-20T17:16:42+00:00April 6th, 2021|Restorative Dentistry|Comments Off on Listen to Your Teeth

MMMMMM! It’s Mouth-Watering

You stand to speak to a crowd of thousands–and your mouth is desert-dry. That's normal. But under less stressful circumstances, a dry mouth is not normal. In fact, it's a cause for concern. Saliva has a critical role in the health of your mouth and your body. It flushes out the plaque that causes tooth decay and periodontal disease and acts as a buffer against overly acid mouth. Dry mouth, then, can lead to cavities—and to any of those sometimes serious disorders lately linked to periodontal disease. It can cause halitosis and make the tissue of your mouth vulnerable to infection. It can even create difficulties in speaking and eating. While dry mouth occurs most often in the elderly, it's [...]

By |2020-12-29T17:25:54+00:00March 23rd, 2021|Restorative Dentistry|Comments Off on MMMMMM! It’s Mouth-Watering

Check Your Dental I.Q.

Read each question and choose the best answer. Scoring below. 1. The best toothbrush bristle is: (a) Medium (b) Hard (c) soft (d) electric 2. Teeth grinding and gnashing (bruxism) can lead to: (a) pain in the neck (b) Sore teeth (c) Headaches (d) all of the above 3. The dentist's word for cavities: (a) holey teeth (b) caries (c) cartels (d) fillings 4. Straightening of the teeth is called: (a) orthodontics (b) pediatrics (c) geometry (d) endodontics 5. It's been proven that fluoride: (a) is experimental (b) makes teeth resistant to decay (c) is found in popcorn 6. Expectant mothers should visit the dentist: (a) before the child is born (b) during odd-numbered months (c) not until the baby [...]

By |2020-12-29T17:23:59+00:00March 16th, 2021|Patient Education|Comments Off on Check Your Dental I.Q.

No More Metal Mouth

You don't have to be a dentist to know that metal is NOT a normal component of teeth. Used to be, gold or silver amalgam was necessary to restore structural integrity to damaged teeth (especially molars) that would be subjected to the great stress caused by chewing. Today, there are new materials that stand up to the stress, but without the metal! They simply didn't exist just a generation ago. For example, modern porcelain onlays and inlays can replace metal fillings even on back teeth, while leaving them looking as good as—or possibly better than—the originals. Because these replacement fillings are constructed to be so superior, you no longer need to settle for "metal mouth." And in terms of your [...]

By |2020-12-01T00:14:32+00:00December 1st, 2020|Cosmetic Dentistry|Comments Off on No More Metal Mouth

Sense about Sensitivity

When teeth hurt, the sooner we reach the root of the problem, the sooner the pain disappears. What triggers tooth pain? Heat, cold, touch, air, sweet or sour foods. If you recently had a cavity filled, that area may be sensitive for a while. Other causes of sensitivity are: Erosion of tooth enamel. Gum shrinkage down below the crown exposing the cementum beneath, an area sensitive to heat and cold. One or more teeth shifting into a position where they strike too hard against other teeth. This can happen to anyone, but it's most frequent when a lost tooth is not replaced. Clenching or grinding of teeth, whether awake or asleep. Try This At Home Desensitizing toothpaste (look for the [...]

By |2020-07-27T19:07:32+00:00November 24th, 2020|Restorative Dentistry|Comments Off on Sense about Sensitivity