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Do You Have A Salivary Stone?

A healthy flow of saliva is critical for chewing and digestion, bathing gums, and bacterial control. And we owe it all to salivary glands, three pairs of organs in the cheek and floor of the mouth. Each gland secretes saliva into the mouth via a tube, and this is where trouble can begin. Sialolithiasis—whew—names the condition that results from a small calcified stone blocking the salivary duct. Clearly, a kink in the duct will cause swelling of the gland itself. And swelling usually means a measure of pain. X-rays, ultrasound or an MRI will reveal any salivary gland blockage. In some people, stones recur again and again and may warrant minor surgery. Or a dentist, by fairly simple manual manipulation, [...]

By |2022-07-12T16:35:58+00:00August 9th, 2022|Patient Education|Comments Off on Do You Have A Salivary Stone?

Dentistry and the Older Adult

With people living longer, we, as dentists, recognize that the dental profession must shoulder a new responsibility for enduring dental care. We all hope we'll live to a ripe old age. At the same time, we want to enjoy the rest of our years and live a quality life. As people age, they become more prone to certain chronic conditions. Old adults may encounter root decay, erosion of the root surfaces, fracturing of fillings and brittle teeth, or gum infection. People with dentures or partials may find that their bony ridges will continue to recede. What can be done? Root decay and gum disease—Continue to use fluoride toothpaste with tartar and plaque control. There are some newer toothpastes and rinses [...]

By |2022-01-04T20:39:07+00:00February 8th, 2022|Restorative Dentistry|Comments Off on Dentistry and the Older Adult

Is Your Mouth Older Than…

A mouth at age 50 enters a whole new world marked by a set of problems you never dreamed of when your mouth was filled with bubble gum and the latest slang. Celebrate Great Taste! Expect taste buds to fade gradually with age. But the senses of taste and smell can disappear quickly in diabetics—or overnight as a result of stroke, Parkinson's, or Huntington's Disease. Have the loss checked out—and make food more palatable with herbs and spices. Don't Swallow Bitterness! Menopause often leads to hormonal imbalance or to vitamin or mineral deficiency, resulting in a bitter taste or burning in the mouth. Detection of the deficiency can lead to correction of the problem. Tender is the Face TMJ (temporomandibular [...]

By |2021-02-20T17:22:45+00:00April 27th, 2021|Restorative Dentistry|Comments Off on Is Your Mouth Older Than…

MMMMMM! It’s Mouth-Watering

You stand to speak to a crowd of thousands–and your mouth is desert-dry. That's normal. But under less stressful circumstances, a dry mouth is not normal. In fact, it's a cause for concern. Saliva has a critical role in the health of your mouth and your body. It flushes out the plaque that causes tooth decay and periodontal disease and acts as a buffer against overly acid mouth. Dry mouth, then, can lead to cavities—and to any of those sometimes serious disorders lately linked to periodontal disease. It can cause halitosis and make the tissue of your mouth vulnerable to infection. It can even create difficulties in speaking and eating. While dry mouth occurs most often in the elderly, it's [...]

By |2020-12-29T17:25:54+00:00March 23rd, 2021|Restorative Dentistry|Comments Off on MMMMMM! It’s Mouth-Watering

Xerostomia (Dry Mouth)

News to Make a Mouth Water… A thick, juicy prime rib of beef surrounded by a baked potato—all the trimmings—asparagus with drawn butter, fresh apple cobbler a la mode. Got your mouth watering? Good. Your salivary glands have been stimulated. And saliva's a whole lot more important to you than helping you enjoy that special meal. A Few Other Things You Might Find Good to Know About Saliva... It has a critical role in the health of your mouth—and your body. It's a natural mouth rinse, flushing out the plaque that causes decay and periodontal disease. It acts as a buffer against overly acid mouth. Lack of saliva is a serious problem—and not an uncommon one. We call it xerostomia. [...]

By |2020-12-01T00:15:55+00:00December 8th, 2020|Restorative Dentistry|Comments Off on Xerostomia (Dry Mouth)

Fast Facts About Dry Mouth

Here are some facts about dry mouth, which can be a frustrating condition... We call it xerostomia—and it can be a serious problem. It tends to happen as we age—but it doesn't have to. Besides being uncomfortable, it makes teeth more cavity-prone. It can be the side effect of some medications or radiation therapy for cancer. Fight dry mouth by drinking 6-8 glasses of water daily. Also, try sugarless gum or lozenges—mouth-wetting agents. There are prescriptions product to combat dry mouth. So feel free to talk to us—we can help!

By |2020-06-27T20:31:43+00:00July 21st, 2020|Restorative Dentistry|Comments Off on Fast Facts About Dry Mouth

Facing Chemotherapy?

Tell Your Dentist Anyone facing cancer therapy already knows—chemotherapy for the treatment of cancer is a serious response to a serious condition. What they may not know is that a dental appointment scheduled at least two weeks before treatment begins can reduce the risk of complications and help preserve salivary glands. The reason is this: with radiation treatment and chemotherapy, changes in saliva occur that can encourage decay and dry mouth, diminish taste, and thicken soft tissues—to name a few. All these side effects may be overcome if gums are healthy, restorations are intact, and oral hygiene habits are impeccable. So, if someone you know is scheduled for cancer therapy, share this information with them. A pre-treatment dental appointment made [...]

By |2020-03-28T17:19:38+00:00May 26th, 2020|Patient Education|Comments Off on Facing Chemotherapy?

Diabetes and Your Mouth

Tell Your Dentist About Your Diabetes We could be first to know. Don't let us be the last. Diabetes affects the blood chemistry and metabolism of those who suffer from the condition. Without proper medication, people with diabetes run the risk of multiple severe disorders. However, early detection can ward off the dangers, and we dentists are often the first to notice clues. So be sure to keep your regular dental appointments and cleaning Diabetes Implications for Oral Health People with the condition are more likely than others to develop tooth decay, periodontal (gum) disease, fungal infections, dry mouth, impaired taste, and inflammatory skin disease. They also may suffer from delayed healing and an increased risk of infections. For many [...]

By |2019-11-16T19:33:43+00:00February 4th, 2020|Patient Education|Comments Off on Diabetes and Your Mouth