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Tongue Tales

Traditionally, doctors and dentists have depended on the tongue to help them diagnose various diseases. And tongues do have a lot to say. For example, scarlet fever is accompanied by a spotted "strawberry" tongue. Burning tongue, a very painful condition, affects primarily post-menopausal women and can reflect systemic problems. Hairy leukoplakia is a common AIDS-related oral lesion. And candidiasis, a fungus infection which coats the tongue white, also says something is wrong. Now you know why, when you're asked to stick out your tongue and say...Ahhhhh...

By |2022-01-04T20:47:55+00:00March 22nd, 2022|Preventative Dentistry|Comments Off on Tongue Tales

Watch Your Mouth

Self Examinations can Spot Signs of Trouble Through the day, you check the mirror—your hair, your collar, your hem. Ever open your mouth to see what's inside? You should, and not just when you feel pain or find blood on your toothbrush. You should routinely examine your oral orifice for any changes. Watch for red or white spots or other discolorations and small sores or swellings. Most of these oral lesions, as we call them, are harmless and easily explained. A tortilla chip or crust of French bread bruised your mouth, for example. But if you use alcohol or tobacco, or if you're being treated for any number of systemic diseases—such as diabetes or autoimmune disorders—these little irritations could signal [...]

By |2021-10-20T19:28:10+00:00December 14th, 2021|Preventative Dentistry|Comments Off on Watch Your Mouth

Information on Oral Lesions

During the course of a day, you're likely to have a look inside your mouth and briefly survey the landscape. We hope so, anyway. Aside from the stray loose filling or that crown that will need repair soon, fuss over the soft tissues in your mouth—the mucous membrane, the skin. Are there any red or white spots you haven't noticed before? Maybe you have taken a wait-and-see approach to a small sore you found last week. Any unexplained swelling? Discoloration that doesn't hurt a lick? Come on in; we need to see what you see. Most oral lesions, as we call them, are harmless. A piece of crusty French bread with dinner can scratch delicate tissues. But if you use [...]

By |2020-12-29T16:50:00+00:00January 5th, 2021|Patient Education|Comments Off on Information on Oral Lesions