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Making Bad Breath Go Away

Where Bad Breath Comes From Most, but not all, bad breath comes from bacterial plaque and food accumulated mainly towards the back of the tongue. The problem is, there are all sorts of not-likely-but-possible other reasons for halitosis: upset stomach, anxiety, inflamed gums, saliva deficiency, infections and removable dentures are among them. What Not To Do Because nobody—but nobody!—wants bad breath, a billion-dollar industry has sprung up hawking a variety of mouthwashes, rinses, drops, pastes and mints to mask halitosis. But there's a huge difference between hiding the symptoms and treating the cause of Dragon Breath. Take mouthwash. It tastes and feels like it's solving the problem. But most mouthwashes are alcohol-based. Alcohol dries out the mouth, which can re-ignite [...]

By |2022-01-27T19:33:32+00:00July 26th, 2022|Restorative Dentistry|Comments Off on Making Bad Breath Go Away

Dead Toothbrushes

A really dead toothbrush—one badly worn and frayed, not necessarily just old—is like having no toothbrush at all. In fact, you're probably doing more harm than good if your brush has seen better days. All dead toothbrushes should be given a decent burial. If you have doubts about the life left in your toothbrush, bring it in at your next appointment, and we can assess the damage. We've seen a lot of sorry-looking brushes, but maybe yours will take the prize. Why they should R.I.P. Plaque will stick with you. A dead toothbrush doesn't stand up to plaque, which means you simply won't get your teeth so clean. And a new brush works more quickly at plaque tasks. You can [...]

By |2021-10-20T19:34:19+00:00January 4th, 2022|Patient Education|Comments Off on Dead Toothbrushes

Fluoride, it’s for Life

If your goal is healthy teeth for life, then you need fluoride. It ensures newly formed teeth are strong; prevents plaque, cavities, and gum disease; and protects roots that get exposed as gums recede over time. This essential mineral is present in what we eat and drink, but a healthy diet doesn't supply enough for a gleaming smile. Instead, it's important to apply it topically and drink fluoride-rich water. In toothpaste, it boosts the cavity resistance of existing teeth. Systemic fluoride, in water, creates healthy tooth structure and supplies fluoride for the saliva. Are You Sure There's Fluoride In Your Water? Bottled water intake is skyrocketing. That'd be great news health-wise, except most bottled water falls far short of the [...]

By |2021-10-20T19:30:03+00:00December 21st, 2021|Preventative Dentistry|Comments Off on Fluoride, it’s for Life

Stroke Prevention: Routine Dental Hygiene Appointments

You may wonder what a tooth cleaning has to do with a stroke—that sudden, devastating paralysis in which blood supply to the brain is blocked. Simply put, it's the result of a buildup of plaque in the arteries. Yes, their is a direct correlation between the plaque in arteries and the plaque that builds up on teeth and causes inflammation and gum disease if not professionally cleaned from time to time. A hygiene appointment is probably the easiest and most painless way of eliminating at least one of the risk factors leading to stroke. Warning Signs—and Responses Act in time and call 911 if you, or someone you love, experiences: Sudden weakness in hand, arm, leg Loss of feeling on [...]

By |2021-10-20T19:22:14+00:00November 16th, 2021|Periodontal Dentistry|Comments Off on Stroke Prevention: Routine Dental Hygiene Appointments

What to Know About Gum Disease

It afflicts as many as nine in 10 adults at some point in their lives, as well as teenagers and children as young as five or six years of age. Yet, many suffer from it without even suspecting anything is wrong. "It" is periodontal, or gum, disease—in the minds of most dentists, Public Enemy Number one for teeth. Only for the last 30 years have researchers understood that gum disease is an infectious disorder, caused by many different species of bacteria. But even today, there is no cure. Fortunately, we have learned a good deal about what periodontal disease is and what can be done about it. Behind the Scenes The culprits in periodontal disease are the bacteria that thrive [...]

By |2021-07-03T18:49:33+00:00October 12th, 2021|Periodontal Dentistry|Comments Off on What to Know About Gum Disease

Can You Catch a Cavity?

When you have a cold, we all know to cover your mouth before you sneeze and not to drink out of the same glass. We do this because we know that a cold is contagious. Now we know that chances are, so is tooth decay. Recent research suggests that the germs responsible for cavities may be "catchy." Likewise, scientists suspect that bacteria associated with gum disease may be transferable from husband to wife, or mother to child. Infants get the bacteria that come to inhabit the mouth and digestive tract soon after birth. These germs are usually transferred in the course of handling by the babies' mothers or other family members, and anything involving contact with saliva—parents kissing their babies [...]

By |2021-06-25T20:53:46+00:00September 7th, 2021|Preventative Dentistry|Comments Off on Can You Catch a Cavity?

Got Fluoride?

As we age, wrinkles and graying hair become evident. For adults, there's no reversing the aging process. But happily, a lifetime of fluoride use can help reverse the demineralizing process! Bacterial plaque continually forms on teeth, producing acids that initiate the process of decay. That's DE-mineralization. Fluoride helps add back calcium and phosphate. That's RE-mineralization. Keep your fluoridation levels up! If you're an adult, you should make a topical fluoride treatment part of your regular hygiene appointment. Don't forget to request it the next time you're in the office!

By |2021-06-25T20:40:39+00:00July 6th, 2021|Preventative Dentistry|Comments Off on Got Fluoride?

MMMMMM! It’s Mouth-Watering

You stand to speak to a crowd of thousands–and your mouth is desert-dry. That's normal. But under less stressful circumstances, a dry mouth is not normal. In fact, it's a cause for concern. Saliva has a critical role in the health of your mouth and your body. It flushes out the plaque that causes tooth decay and periodontal disease and acts as a buffer against overly acid mouth. Dry mouth, then, can lead to cavities—and to any of those sometimes serious disorders lately linked to periodontal disease. It can cause halitosis and make the tissue of your mouth vulnerable to infection. It can even create difficulties in speaking and eating. While dry mouth occurs most often in the elderly, it's [...]

By |2020-12-29T17:25:54+00:00March 23rd, 2021|Restorative Dentistry|Comments Off on MMMMMM! It’s Mouth-Watering

The Basics of Flossing

One of the simplest preventive hygiene exercises you can do for yourself is something you've heard of before. It bears repeating: floss. Every 24 hours, bacteria contribute to a new batch of plaque. Brushing, no matter how well or how long, won't get all the "bugs," especially between teeth and where your teeth meet gum tissue. Flossing before or after brushing should be a part of everyone's home care program. The kind of floss—waxed, unwaxed, or tape—doesn't matter. Just choose what you're comfortable with and use it. Wrap about 18 inches of floss around your fingers. Give yourself an inch or two to work with. If the floss frays or builds up with debris, re-loop the floss and keep at [...]

By |2020-12-29T17:12:45+00:00February 9th, 2021|Preventative Dentistry|Comments Off on The Basics of Flossing

Xerostomia (Dry Mouth)

News to Make a Mouth Water… A thick, juicy prime rib of beef surrounded by a baked potato—all the trimmings—asparagus with drawn butter, fresh apple cobbler a la mode. Got your mouth watering? Good. Your salivary glands have been stimulated. And saliva's a whole lot more important to you than helping you enjoy that special meal. A Few Other Things You Might Find Good to Know About Saliva... It has a critical role in the health of your mouth—and your body. It's a natural mouth rinse, flushing out the plaque that causes decay and periodontal disease. It acts as a buffer against overly acid mouth. Lack of saliva is a serious problem—and not an uncommon one. We call it xerostomia. [...]

By |2020-12-01T00:15:55+00:00December 8th, 2020|Restorative Dentistry|Comments Off on Xerostomia (Dry Mouth)