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Got Fluoride?

As we age, wrinkles and graying hair become evident. For adults, there's no reversing the aging process. But happily, a lifetime of fluoride use can help reverse the demineralizing process! Bacterial plaque continually forms on teeth, producing acids that initiate the process of decay. That's DE-mineralization. Fluoride helps add back calcium and phosphate. That's RE-mineralization. Keep your fluoridation levels up! If you're an adult, you should make a topical fluoride treatment part of your regular hygiene appointment. Don't forget to request it the next time you're in the office!

By |2021-06-25T20:40:39+00:00July 6th, 2021|Preventative Dentistry|Comments Off on Got Fluoride?

Can Kissing Cause Cavities?

Sorry to say, it can. In fact, anything involving contact with saliva—a kiss, parents tasting their babies' food, sharing of tableware, and toothbrushes—can transmit decay-causing bacteria. Soon after birth, infants start to get those bacteria that inhabit the mouth and cause cavities. These germs are usually transferred by the babies' mothers or other family members. When one so innocent can be SO susceptible, we need to provide our mouths with the best defense against the enemy. Brushing and flossing are a good beginning, as they interrupt the growth of bacterial plaque. Getting teeth straightened can help, because straight teeth are better able to resist cavities. Less frequent snacking and diets low in sugary foods reduce the amount of bacteria acids [...]

By |2020-06-27T20:32:42+00:00September 1st, 2020|Preventative Dentistry|Comments Off on Can Kissing Cause Cavities?

Fluoride & Your Health

What is fluoride, and why is it good for my teeth? Fluoride is a compound of the element fluorine, which is found universally throughout nature in water, soil, air, and in most foods. The mineral is easily absorbed into tooth enamel, especially in the developing teeth of children. Once teeth form, it makes the entire tooth structure more resistant to decay and promotes remineralization, which aids in repairing early decay before the damage is even visible. "Systemic" fluoride is that which is in food or drink. It's typically added to public and private water supplies, soft drinks and teas, and is also available in dietary supplement form. Once absorbed through the gastrointestinal tract, it spreads throughout the entire body. However, [...]

By |2019-11-16T19:38:28+00:00February 18th, 2020|Preventative Dentistry|Comments Off on Fluoride & Your Health