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Dead Toothbrushes

A really dead toothbrush—one badly worn and frayed, not necessarily just old—is like having no toothbrush at all. In fact, you're probably doing more harm than good if your brush has seen better days. All dead toothbrushes should be given a decent burial. If you have doubts about the life left in your toothbrush, bring it in at your next appointment, and we can assess the damage. We've seen a lot of sorry-looking brushes, but maybe yours will take the prize. Why they should R.I.P. Plaque will stick with you. A dead toothbrush doesn't stand up to plaque, which means you simply won't get your teeth so clean. And a new brush works more quickly at plaque tasks. You can [...]

By |2021-10-20T19:34:19+00:00January 4th, 2022|Patient Education|Comments Off on Dead Toothbrushes

Test Your Toothbrush I.Q.

Did you know the toothbrush was invented by the Chinese in the 15th century? These first toothbrushes were made of hog bristles. Today, most toothbrushes are made from nylon monofilaments which dry quickly and resist breakage. Did you know a worn-out toothbrush is dangerous? Bent bristles can injure soft tissues. Worn, frayed bristles won't be effective plaque fighters, either. Did you know soft bristles are generally preferred to hard bristles? Soft bristles bend easily and clean better below the gum line. Hard bristles can damage teeth and gums. Did you know two toothbrushes are better than one? By staggering the use of your toothbrush, you give it a chance to dry out between uses and help it live longer. Did [...]

By |2021-07-03T18:47:59+00:00October 5th, 2021|Patient Education|Comments Off on Test Your Toothbrush I.Q.

Check Your Dental I.Q.

Read each question and choose the best answer. Scoring below. 1. The best toothbrush bristle is: (a) Medium (b) Hard (c) soft (d) electric 2. Teeth grinding and gnashing (bruxism) can lead to: (a) pain in the neck (b) Sore teeth (c) Headaches (d) all of the above 3. The dentist's word for cavities: (a) holey teeth (b) caries (c) cartels (d) fillings 4. Straightening of the teeth is called: (a) orthodontics (b) pediatrics (c) geometry (d) endodontics 5. It's been proven that fluoride: (a) is experimental (b) makes teeth resistant to decay (c) is found in popcorn 6. Expectant mothers should visit the dentist: (a) before the child is born (b) during odd-numbered months (c) not until the baby [...]

By |2020-12-29T17:23:59+00:00March 16th, 2021|Patient Education|Comments Off on Check Your Dental I.Q.

Manual or Mechanical?

Back and forth goes the argument—what toothbrush is best? Gadgeteers can spend $150 for an electric brush designed to rotate and oscillate, with angled neck, sure-grip handle, dual speed control, and even a timer. Researchers say that rotation-oscillation electric brushes remove plaque and reduce gingivitis better than any other kind—but only slightly better. Do-it-yourselfers can pick up a manual toothbrush for under $3 at the pharmacy. Replace it every three months for two years—the warranty period on the electric brush—and you can save big bucks. Kids often prefer electric brushes because the smaller brush head makes it easier to reach those hard-to-reach back teeth. They also like the buzz or one of the singing toothbrushes. Electric brushes are often the [...]

By |2020-06-27T20:32:32+00:00August 25th, 2020|Patient Education|Comments Off on Manual or Mechanical?

Toothpicks: a Pointed Problem

What's long, slender, hard, sharp, indigestible and potentially hazardous? That common and seemingly harmless sliver of wood called a toothpick. Reports in the Journal of the American Medical Association point to toothpicks as causing thousands of injuries a year, mostly to young children. Youngsters aged five to 14 were most likely to be injured by toothpicks, and children under the age of five were 20 times more likely to seriously injure their eyes or ears. Adults should also treat the toothpick with a little respect. Three deaths have been attributed to toothpicks after the people either swallowed or inhaled them by accident. Toothpicks may be small, but their potential dangers are definite points to ponder. If you have a troublesome [...]

By |2020-03-28T17:23:59+00:00June 9th, 2020|Patient Education|Comments Off on Toothpicks: a Pointed Problem

Brushing Tips

What is the best technique for brushing? There are a number of effective brushing techniques. Patients are advised to ask during an appointment to determine which is the best one for them, since tooth position and gum condition vary. One effective, easy-to-remember technique involves using a circular or elliptical motion to brush a couple of teeth at a time, gradually covering the entire mouth. Place a toothbrush beside your teeth at a 45-degree angle and gently brush teeth in an elliptical motion. Brush the outside of the teeth, inside the teeth, your tongue and the chewing surfaces and in between teeth. Using a back and forth motion causes the gum surface to recede, or can expose the root surface or [...]

By |2019-09-29T21:28:42+00:00December 10th, 2019|Preventative Dentistry|Comments Off on Brushing Tips